What’s the future of e-book pricing? | Internet & Media – CNET News

What's the future of e-book pricing? | Internet & Media – CNET News.

from David Carnoy:

“In case you missed it, the U.S. government recently filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple and five of this country’s largest publishers, alleging they conspired to limit competition for the pricing of e-books. Three of the five — HarperCollins, Hachette and Simon & Schuster — opted to settle the case, while Penguin, Macmillan, and Apple didn’t.
So where does that leave us?”

An interesting article that explains more about the e-book pricing situation as it stands, as opposed to just trying to predict where it might be going. Click on the link above for more.

Loving books in all forms

I’ve had a lot of conversations lately with people who are wary of embracing ebooks. They’re die-hard print book lovers and they all share a bit of fear, really, of something that may be trying to take their place. With Amazon reporting that ebooks are outselling print books, it’s a real possibility. Or is it? Either way, is this a change we book lovers should worry about, or a new opportunity we should embrace?

Forbes blogger Stephanie Chandler states succinctly, “Just because ebooks are exceeding print book sales online, it doesn’t take away my desire to own books.” I’ve purchased a number of ebooks and especially enjoyed borrowing them from the library (instant access, right from home, and free!). I find that a good book is a good book whether I’m reading it in print or on my iPad, and by the same token, a bad book is very much a bad book no matter what the format. I’m not resisting the format entirely, but I still like my print books. I still enjoy the feel of a paperback at the beach, or a brand-new hardcover in bed. Still, I don’t think one really has to choose. Once again, Chandler states it well:

So instead of resisting all this change in the publishing world, I’ve decided to embrace what is happening. My bookshelves are bulging, my digital bookshelf is stocked, and even my iPod is loaded with audio books. Variety is good and anything that promotes reading and makes it easier to access is okay with me.

The bottom line is, a book in any form is something I’m interested in.

 

Openlibrary.org

From the Wall Street Journal:

“By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER

SAN FRANCISCO—Libraries are expanding e-book offerings with out-of-print editions, part of a broader effort to expand borrowing privileges in the Internet Age that could challenge traditional ideas about copyright.

Starting Tuesday, a group of libraries led by the Internet Archive, a nonprofit digital library, are joining forces to create a one-stop website for checking out e-books, including access to more than a million scanned public domain books and a catalog of thousands of contemporary e-book titles available at many public libraries.

And in a first, participants including the Boston Public Library and the Marine Biological Laboratory will also contribute scans of a few hundred older books that are still in copyright, but no longer sold commercially. That part of the project could raise eyebrows, because copyright law is unclear in the digital books arena. Google Inc., which is working on its own book scanning efforts, has been mired in a legal brouhaha with authors and publishers over its digital books project.

To read the books, borrowers around the world can download and read them for free on computers or e-reading gadgets. Software renders the books inaccessible once the loan period ends. Two-thirds of American libraries offered e-book loans in 2009, according to a survey by the American Library Association. But those were mostly contemporary imprints from the last couple of years—say, the latest Stephen King novel.

The Internet Archive project, dubbed Openlibrary.org, goes a step further by opening up some access to the sorts of books that may have otherwise gathered dust on library shelves—mainly those published in the past 90 years, but of less popular interest.”

eBook sellers will have to compete on the iPad

Terrific article in the New York Times today mapping out e-book retailer competition on the iPad:

From the start, no one bookstore will come with an advantage: No matter which bookstore application iPad owners choose, they will have to download it first. Even the iBookstore, as Apple writes on its Web site, won’t come preloaded on the device. iPad owners will be asked to “Download the iBooks app free from the App Store.”

It sounds obvious, but I didn’t quite process it until I read it today. In fact, the other day I was Googling around about methods for importing Banes & Noble e-book purchases onto an iPad (this isn’t a good one, for this very reason). The answer is that I won’t. I’ll just download the B&N e-reader app to my iPad and read them there, easy peesy. And that’s *why* there’s a Kindle App for the iPad, and one from B&N, and so on. They want to keep you buying their product, wherever you’re reading it.