Color your own Red Wedding – Game of Thrones coloring book out this October

khal_drogo

Khal Drogo, From the online Game of Thrones coloring book.

UPDATE: This (old) post gets a lot of hits looking for the book, now published — so here it is:

Given my recent return to coloring, this caught my interest — coming October 2015, a “Game of Thones” coloring book. From Daily Dot:

Forget the Red Wedding and the Purple Wedding. Thanks to the newly announced Game of Thrones coloring book, you can make sure all of your infamous nuptials are hued in Jazzberry Jam, Purple Pizzazz, or Razzle Dazzle Rose.

The new coloring book for adults will feature 45 images based on characters and scenes from the series. Presumably, the activity will be a particularly vital form of therapy for stressed-out fans of the series. Now you can finally give Joffrey his royal due by coloring him a nice shade of Eggplant, or imbue all of the Three-Eyed Raven’s visions with a hue of Robin Egg Blue or Granny Smith Apple.

Until October rolls around, Westeros fans can play with this unsanctioned online coloring book instead.

Amazon releases “Kindle Unlimited”: Read as much as you want for $9.99 a month

I got an email today about whether or not I want to have the book I edited, Dearest Girl of Mine, included in “Amazon Unlimited” (I said yes; it was a project I enjoyed thoroughly in another time of my life, but it was never anything more than an academic exercise). I had heard rumors about the new service but didn’t know it was ready to go.

Amazon’s long-rumored e-book subscription service is now a reality: “Kindle Unlimited.”
The company announced the $9.99-per-month service on Friday and said that it would let users “freely read as much as they want from over 600,000 Kindle books.” A portion of Audible’s audiobook library is also included.

Of course, the 600,000 titles represent only a small slice of all the Kindle books for sale through Amazon’s sprawling online store. This is due in part to disagreements between Amazon and some major publishers.

But the service has a number of hit titles that Amazon is promoting, including “The Hunger Games,” the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, “Diary of a Wimpy Kid,” and the new Michael Lewis book “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt.”

via Amazon: Read as much as you want for $9.99 a month – Jul. 18, 2014.

Hmmm. While it sounds interesting, as a Prime member I already get to borrow one book a month, and I rarely do that. Not sure I’d be willing to fork over $10 a month extra for more.

Harry Potter gets new book covers for 15th anniversary

Paperback editions will have art by Kazu Kibuishi that focuses on a scene from each novel.

Harry Potter gets new book covers for 15th anniversary.

Interesting title: Advent by James Treadwell – Simon & Schuster

Sent my way recently by the publisher — and free to a good within-the-48-states home (first come first serve). Drop a line in the comments if interested.

Advent by James Treadwell – Simon & Schuster

A drowning, a magician’s curse, and a centuries-old secret.

“1537. A man hurries through city streets in a gathering snowstorm, clutching a box in one hand. He is Johann Faust, the greatest magician of his age. The box he carries contains a mirror safeguarding a portion of his soul and a small ring containing all the magic in the world. Together, they comprise something unimaginably dangerous.

London, the present day. Fifteen-year-old Gavin Stokes is boarding a train to the countryside to live with his aunt. His school and his parents can’t cope with him and the things he sees, things they tell him don’t really exist. At Pendurra, Gavin finds people who are like him, who see things too. They all make the same strange claim: magic exists, it’s leaking back into our world, and it’s bringing something terrible with it.

First in a trilogy, Advent describes how magic was lost to humanity, and how a fifteen-year-old boy discovers that its return is his inheritance. It begins in a world recognizably our own, and ends an extraordinarily long way from where it started—somewhere much bigger, stranger, and richer.”

New tools make self-publishing e-books easier – USATODAY.com

Many new authors have found most of their success online, selling self-published books at Amazon for the Kindle and other e-readers.

They handle the entire process themselves — from downloading stock photos at $4 to $5 a pop and making covers in Gimp, a free photo software tool, to converting the manuscripts into formats compatible for the e-readers.

“If I can do it, anyone can,” says Nicholson, 49, who writes four novels a year from his home in Boone, N.C. He won’t say how much he makes, but it’s a “comfortable living,” solely on e-book royalties. “I’m self-taught on every part of this.”

From New tools make self-publishing e-books easier – USATODAY.com.

Harry Potter ebooks will be distributed by Google Books

Google Books to distribute Harry Potter e-books

Google will handle distribution and purchases of the e-book versions of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, which is due out this fall. Rowling has decided to shun the publishing industry by self-publishing the e-book version of the Potter series, and selling the books directly to customers, through the Pottermore website. To achieve this goal, the Harry Potter series will be distributed through Google Books, starting this fall. Digital audiobooks formats will also be available.

Amazon says e-books outsell print books

From NPR’s Morning Edition:

“Historians site 1952 as a year that America reached a media watershed. That year, more Americans watched television in the evenings than listened to the radio. Maybe historians will mark 2011 as a similar kind of year for books. The giant retailer Amazon says that, as of now, it is selling more electronic books than books in print. Since April, the company says that for every 100 paperbacks or hard covers, it moves 105 e-books.”

Editing “Harry Potter” — the job of a lifetime

In honor of the release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 on DVD this week, an interview with the woman who once had one of the coolest jobs on the planet, in my opinion: proofreader and later editor of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books.

Riverton woman says editing ‘Potter’ books was top-secret job.

Susan Jeffers had the privilege of reading Harry’s new adventures before any of the rest of us — but she couldn’t breathe a word of what she’d read to anyone.

There were many who would have loved to leak the plot before the book was published. Some websites even made up the plot of the next books and tried to pass them off as authentic. Susan says she felt an obligation to kids all over the world to keep things quiet.

“The kids were waiting so anxiously for each one,” she says. “I just felt that there was no way this could be spoiled for them.”

Jeffers described it as “the job of a lifetime”, and I concur — enviously.

HarperCollins Puts 26-Loan Cap on Ebook Circulations

From Library Journal, some alarming news:

In the first significant revision to lending terms for ebook circulation, HarperCollins has announced that new titles licensed from library ebook vendors will be able to circulate only 26 times before the license expires.

If a lending period is two weeks, the 26 circulation limit is likely to equal roughly one year of use for a popular title. For a three-week lending period, that stretches to a year and a half.

For librarians—many of whom are already frustrated with ebooks lending policies and user interface issues—further license restrictions seem to come at a particularly bad time, given strained budgets nationwide. It may also disproportionately affect libraries that set shorter loan periods for ebook circulation.

While HarperCollins is the first major publisher to amend the terms of loan for its titles, two other members of the publishing “big six”—Macmillan and Simon & Schuster—still do not allow ebooks to be circulated in libraries, much to the consternation of librarians.

Read more: HarperCollins Puts 26 Loan Cap on Ebook Circulations.